Egyptian dating customs

Egyptologist Zahi Hawass notes: To judge from their portrayal in the art that fills the golden king's tomb, this was certainly the case [that they loved one another].We can feel the love between them as we see the queen standing in front of her husband giving him flowers and accompanying him while he was hunting (51).In a coffin inscription from the 21st Dynasty a husband says of his wife, "Woe, you have been taken from me, the one with the beautiful face; there was none like her and I found nothing bad about you." The husband in this inscription signs himself, "your brother and mate" and in many other similar inscriptions men and women are seen as equal partners and friends in a relationship.

Thus he could be certain that children of their union - his heirs and the inheritors of his property - were his.

There was no official sanction against a woman engaging in extra-marital intercourse.

The private punishments were divorce, beatings, and sometimes death (204).

Ankhsenamun is always pictured with her husband but this is not unusual as such images are common.

What makes these particular ones so interesting is how the artist emphasizes their devotion to each other by their proximity, hand gestures, and facial expressions.

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The speaker in the Chester Beatty Papyrus passage not only praises his beloved but presents the Egyptian ideal of feminine beauty at the time: My sister is unique - no one can rival her, for she is the most beautiful woman alive. Gold is nothing compared to her arms and her fingers are like lotus flowers. As for her thighs - they only add to her beauty (Lewis, 203).

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